Author: thebookr

Amelia’s Hope…by Candis Vargo

Posted April 16, 2017 by thebookr in Books, Reviews / 0 Comments
Amelia’s Hope…by Candis Vargo

Cara Michaels diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer shortly after she finds out she is pregnant. She decides to forgo chemotherapy during her pregnancy even though it means certain death for herself. ‘Amelia’s Hope’ describes her struggle through cancer treatment and pregnancy.   To say ‘Amelia’s Hope’ was tear-jerker is a vast understatement. Cara’s situation was both touching and devastating. Waiting to find out what would happen kept me racing through the pages. I found Cara’s situation both heart wrenching and touching. Her husbands support brought tears to my eyes. Cara’s genuine realizations at the little she would never to experience with her daughter was especially sad.   I  loved the character of Cara and definitely connected with her. Even though the decision to forgo chemotherapy was Cara’s to make, I can’t say I agreed with her decision. The  book  explains that if she has chemo the risk to the baby is mostly in the first trimester. After that the risk is much smaller. I think that Cara’s decision to forgo all treatment during pregnancy was not one I would have made. She sentences herself to certain death. This absolutely devastates her family.     I did really love the pacing and the […]

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Stinky Steve: A Minecraft Mishap…by P.T. Evans, Illustrated by Tashjian

Posted April 15, 2017 by thebookr in Books, Reviews / 0 Comments
Stinky Steve: A Minecraft Mishap…by P.T. Evans, Illustrated by Tashjian

Stinky Steve is a character in Minecraft. Steve discovers he has a flatulence problem. Steve discovers that this issue can actually help him in his journey through Minecraft.   My kids love Minecraft. Saying they are totally obsessed is an understatement. They also really love bathroom humor.I thought ‘Stinky Steve’ would be a great Minecraft fan fiction book for us to review together.   My kids loved all the off-color jokes and references to Minecraft. They  also really liked how at Steve was constantly ….well you know.   They were able to read most of the dialogue themselves. I would say the reading level is around second or third grade. We definitely will be picking up more books in the series.

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Cheesus Was Here…by J.C. Adams

Posted April 8, 2017 by thebookr in Book Tours, Giveaways, Reviews / 0 Comments
Cheesus Was Here…by J.C. Adams

  Cheesus Was Here by J.C. Davis Publisher: Sky Pony Press Release Date: April 11th, 2017 Genre: Realistic Fiction, Contemporary, Young Adult, Humor, Fiction Synopsis: Sixteen-year-old Delaney Delgado knows miracles aren’t real—if they were, her kid sister wouldn’t be dead. So when the image of baby Jesus appears on a Babybel cheese wheel, she’s not buying the idea that God’s got a dairy obsession. Soon, religious signs begin turning up all over Del’s hometown, tiny Clemency, Texas. Overnight, news vans fill the streets and religious pilgrims start searching for God in the discount aisle of the grocery store.   Hell-bent on proving the so-called miracles are fake, Del convinces her best friend, Gabe, to help her find the truth. While Gabe’s willing to play detective, as a preacher’s son he’s more interested in finding evidence that supports the miracles. But when the whole town becomes caught up in religious fervor and even the late-night talk show hosts have stopped laughing and started to believe, finding the truth might cause more trouble than Del can handle. This novel is neither pro nor anti-religion, and will appeal to fans of contemporary YA novels that explore deep themes with an element of humor. The […]

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Everyday Magic…by Emily Albright

Posted April 5, 2017 by thebookr in Books, Reviews / 0 Comments
Everyday Magic…by Emily Albright

Maggie’s father is a big Hollywood director. He is domineering and loves to have control. Maggie’s father wants her to become an entertainment lawyer. Maggie’s dream is to work in the fashion industry. ‘Everyday Magic’ tells of Maggie’s struggle to be who she wants to be and break free from her father’s grasp. ‘Everyday Magic’ is a companion book to Albright’s first book, ‘The Heir and the Spare’. ‘Everyday Magic’ features Preston, one of the background characters from ‘THATS’. I did not realize this until I was already finished with ‘Everyday Magic.’ You do not necessarily need to read “THATS’ to understand the events in ‘Everyday Magic’. With that being said, there were elements in the story that left me with questions. For example, how did Evie (an American) become a Duchess Suo Juro (in her own right) and why is a British prince living in a flat with friends. An important element of this book is the abuse Maggie and her family have to endure at the hands of her father. Maggie’s family dynamics demonstrates that abuse transcends all levels of wealth and status. The character of Maggie was sweet. I found myself rooting for her. She did seem to […]

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I Am Lucille Ball…Brad Meltzer, Christopher Eliopoulos

Posted April 3, 2017 by thebookr in Books, Reviews / 0 Comments
I Am Lucille Ball…Brad Meltzer, Christopher Eliopoulos

‘I Am Lucille Ball’ tells the story of how little Lucy overcame many obstacles to become the legend that she is today. She lost her father as a young child and she is sent to live with relatives who did not appreciate her sense of humor. She is told over and over, by her grandmother, that women are not funny. This did not deter her. She pushed on. Eventually she helped change the way women are looked at in show business and how show business is run in general. I’ve loved Lucy since I was a kid (see what I did there). Lucy’s antics never failed to make me laugh. When you think about it, its amazing that a show made 65 years ago is still entertaining and hilarious. When I need a good laugh, the ‘freezer episode’ (where Lucy and Ethel buy a side of beef not realizing its half a cow), the ‘candy making’ episode, or the ‘Vitameatavegamin’, never let me down. I was super excited to run across this ‘I Am Lucille Ball’ edition of the ‘Ordinary People Change the World Series’. My son is very silly and funny and sometimes he gets in trouble for it. I […]

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The Bone Witch..by Rin Chupeco

Posted March 26, 2017 by thebookr in Books, Reviews / 2 Comments
The Bone Witch..by Rin Chupeco

The Bone Witch(#1) byRin Chupeco Publisher: Sourcebooks Fire Release Date: March 7, 2017 Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy, Paranormal Synopsis: The beast raged; it punctured the air with its spite. But the girl was fiercer.  Tea is different from the other witches inher family. Her gift for necromancy makes her a bone witch, who are feared and ostracized in the kingdom. For theirs is a powerful, elemental magic that can reach beyond the boundaries of the living—and of the human. Great power comes at a price, forcing Tea to leave her homeland to train under the guidance ofan older, wiser bone witch. There, Tea puts all ofher energy into becoming an asha, learning tocontrol her elemental magic and those beasts who will submit byno other force. And Tea must be strong—stronger than she even believes possible. Because war is brewing in the eight king-doms, war that will threaten the sovereignty ofher homeland…and threaten the very survival ofthose she loves. ‘The Bone Witch’ tells the story of ‘Tea’ who was given the gift of necromancy. Because of this gift, she is ostracized by those around her. High fantasy usually isn’t one of my go to genres. I am more of a real world kind […]

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Vigilante…by Kady Cross

Posted March 24, 2017 by thebookr in Book Tours, Books, Reviews / 1 Comment
Vigilante…by Kady Cross

Hadley’s best friend Magda is sexually assaulted. The boys who did it get away without any consequences. Magda commits suicide. Hadley vows revenge. She dons a pink ski mask and attempts to gain ‘justice’ for Magda. ‘Vigilante’ is a raw look at rape culture, suicide, PTSD and male privilege in our society.  Hadley attempts to take back some of the power that was taken from Magda. Although I didn’t  necessarily agree with how Hadley takes back power, I did love how Cross portrayed Hadley as strong and passionate. I also loved the background characters such as Zoe and Gabe. They gave Hadley the support she needed. I also liked how realistically flawed all the characters were. The pace of the book was definitely fast.  I flew through it. The prose was also well done and easy to read. I do think that the story did come on a little strong as fare as ‘rape culture’ in our society is concerned. Also, I would have liked more details of how Drew’s attorney got him and his friends off on the rape charge. There seemed to be a ton of evidence against him. Including evidence that he drugged Magda. The deep undertone of ‘Vigilante’ is that Magda was not […]

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$2.00 A Day:Living On Almost Nothing In America…by Kathryn Edin, H. Luke Shaefer

Posted March 12, 2017 by thebookr in Books, Reviews / 0 Comments
$2.00 A Day:Living On Almost Nothing In America…by Kathryn Edin, H. Luke Shaefer

$2.00 A Day is a non-fiction book about extreme poverty in America. It attempts to explain what causes an individual to be in such dire circumstances. It also highlights what they do to survive. It basically describes how some survive with no cash income. Lately I’ve not been much of a non-fiction fiction reader. I just didn’t seem to come across many non-fic books I’m interested in. ‘$2.00 a Day:Living On Almost Nothing in America’, seemed to highlight an interesting subject so I thought I would give it a shot. The main thrust of this book is that in the U.S., what we think of as ‘traditional welfare’, no longer exists. The federal government eliminated it in the mid-nineties during the Clinton administration. Currently families are only able to get cash from the government if they have minor children and jump through all the government hoops (such as keeping a job). It is also temporary, lasting only for a couple of years. The federal government gives the states money for the upkeep of the ‘welfare’ system. The states disperse it however they would like. This includes dividing the money into other programs and away from people. The authors explain that […]

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Otherwise Known as Possum…by Maria D. Laso

Posted March 5, 2017 by thebookr in Books, Reviews / 0 Comments
Otherwise Known as Possum…by Maria D. Laso

‘Otherwise Known as Possum’ is a middle-grade historical fiction novel. The story takes place in the deep south during at the height of the great depression. The titular character, Possum Porter’s, mother and baby brother recently died in childbirth. Adding to Possum’s grief, her father decides to send her to the town school (up until then she had been homeschooled). Possum’s goals  become to show her daddy that she is too smart for school and to keep her teacher, Ms. Arthington, away from her father.     ‘Otherwise Known as Possum’ reminded me a lot of ‘Little House on the Prairie.’ There were major differences such as the setting and time period. However,the story just had the ‘Little House ‘feel to me. There were also obvious similarities such as ‘Mary Grace’ being the daughter of the  town store owner and she constantly teases ‘Possum’. Also, the town Possum lived in had a ‘Walnut Grove’ type of atmosphere.   What I Loved… I think that historical fiction middle-grade books are very important. In today’s time, where kids spend their time glued to devises, it’s important for them to take glimpses into the past. One of the best ways to do this is by reading a great historical fiction  book. I […]

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Tuck Everlasting…by Natalie Babbitt

Posted February 22, 2017 by thebookr in Books, Reviews / 0 Comments
Tuck Everlasting…by Natalie Babbitt

‘What If You Could Live Forever?’  Winnie Foster is a sheltered child living in the late 1800’s. Winnie is tired of her mother and grandmother’s obsessive ways. Because of this one day Winnie decides to run away. She runs away into the woods next to her home. There she meets the Tuck family. The Tuck family drank from a spring in the woods that gave them eternal life. This was my first time reading ‘Tuck Everlasting.’ I somehow missed reading it as a child . The characters were amazing. The character of Winnie Foster is endearing and relatable. She is both sassy and funny.  One of my favorite elements of her story is her long drawn out conversations with the bull frog.  The characters of the Tuck family are also endearing and relatable. The ‘man in the yellow suit’ was the perfect villain both charming and conniving.  Tongue in cheek metaphors are used throughout the book. An example of this is when the Foster’s cottage is described as saying, ‘Move on-we don’t want you here.’ ‘Tuck Everlasting’ asks and answers a deep moral question.  If you could find the proverbial fountain of youth, would you really want to drink from it? Would you want to watch the world around […]

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