Genre: Historical Fiction

The Woman in the White Kimono…by Ana Johns #Blogtour

The Woman in the White Kimono…by Ana Johns #Blogtour

  Tori Kovac is on a mission to find out what happened to the woman her father fell in love with in the 1950s. Naoko Nakamura is fighting her parents and their traditional Japanese ways to marry the man she loves.   I really love historical fiction. The dual timeline with a present-day perspective is by far my favorite. While there have been a ton of WWII historical fiction lately, they almost all center around the European war. The war in Japan was huge and had so many nuances. I really hope we see more novels about war and the post-war aftermath in the Pacific. ‘The Woman in the White Kimono,’ really brings out how many stories there are to tell about Japan during this time period.   While ‘The Girl in the White Kimono,’ takes place right after the occupation of Japan, […]

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In the Neighborhood of True…by Susan Kaplan Carlton

In the Neighborhood of True…by Susan Kaplan Carlton

“Every time you’re thirsty, take a drink out of the colored persons’ water fountain.”   “Ah, so in the neighborhood of true.” Davis one-dimpled me. “That’s what we say when something’s close enough.”    After her father’s untimely death, Ruth Robb’s mother uproots her and her little sister from New York City to Atlanta, Georgia. The main issue? Ruth is Jewish and she doesn’t want anyone to know. Segregation and blatant racism still loom large in the 1950’s South. Because Ruth’s mother was raised in Atlanta, Ruth is able to hind behind her grandparents non-Jewishness. Ruth must wrestle between being popular and being who she truly is.   I really think books like ‘In the Neighborhood of True’, are important for young adults of today. It helps them to realize that segregation and the civil rights movement are not things of […]

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The Broken Girls…by Simone St. James

The Broken Girls…by Simone St. James

One of my favorite book tubers highly recommended ‘The Broken Girls’. After her description of the book, I knew I had to pick it up. ‘The Broken Girls is a mix of historical fiction, mystery/thriller, and ghost story.    I thought I try a new type of review and give my top ten things I loved about ‘The Broken Girls’ by Simone St. James.     10. The creepy girls boarding school, ‘Idlewild Hall’ and it’s garden that grew nothing. The gloomiest setting I’ve ever read about.   9. The friend bond between Sonia, Katie, CeCe and Roberta. In tough circumstances girls often turn on each other but the roommates stuck together and became true friends.   8. Sonia’s back story. Sonia hasn’t recovered mentally or physically  from her time in Ravensbruck consecration camp. It’s easy to forget that WWII really […]

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The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo…by Taylor Jenkins Reid

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo…by Taylor Jenkins Reid

‘You’re young and your entire generation are casual with words that bear great meaning.’   ‘When you’re given an opportunity to change your life, be ready to do whatever it takes to make it happen. The world doesn’t give you things, you take things.’   ‘Be wary of men with something to prove.’   ‘People think intimacy is about sex. But intimacy is about truth.’   ‘Heartbreak is loss. Divorce is a piece of paper.’     Evelyn Hugo has been through seven husbands and a lifetimes of amazing stories. She is ready to break her silence. She chooses unknown reporter Monique Grant to write her story. Why Monique? What amazing things will she tell Monique? These are the questions on everyone’s lips as Evelyn begins to layout her entire life for everyone to see.   Oh-my-gosh. This book is […]

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The Secret Keeper…by Kate Morton

Posted February 9, 2019 by Karen in Books, Reviews / 0 Comments
The Secret Keeper…by Kate Morton

‘The landscape of one’s childhood was more vibrant than any other. It didn’t matter where it was or what it looked like, the sights and sounds imprinted differently from those encountered later. They became part of a person, inescapable.’   ‘… she and her tap shoes could be swept as easily as dust beneath histories carpet.’   Laurel is a successful actress in modern-day London. Seventy years earlier, her mother Dorothy is doing her best to survive war-torn London. As a child, Laurel witnesses a death that haunts her for the rest of her life. Laurel and Dorothy’s stories come together to form the dual timeline of a family’s secrets.   I love stories that take place in WWII London. I also love me some Kate Morton. She is one of my favorite authors and the ‘Forgotten Garden’ is one […]

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Between Before & After…by Maureen Doyle McQuerry

Between Before & After…by Maureen Doyle McQuerry

Favorite Quotes   ‘If we learn anything from a story at all, it’s through identification’   ‘It made me feel like a story could be more than words on paper, a living thing that may change in unpredictable ways.’   ‘Hope is made not given.’   ‘Once you open yourself  to miracles, they start showing up all around you.’   My Review   Elaine is the child of poor Irish immigrants. She is growing up in turn of the century New York City. When Elaine’s mother dies from the Spanish flu, Elaine struggles to keep her family together.   Elaine’s daughter, Molly, is growing up in 1950’s San José, California. She is crushed by the breakup of her parents marriage and desperately attempting to understand her distant mother and learn her secrets. I really love historical fiction. I find I […]

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Caroline (Little House Revisited)…by Sarah Miller

Caroline (Little House Revisited)…by Sarah Miller

 The books that really got me reading as a child are the ‘Little House’ series. I was also a huge fan of the show (I cried during the finale). One Christmas my parents gave me a boxed set of all the ‘Little House’ books. I still have them today . When I heard about ‘Caroline’ I couldn’t wait to read it. Also, I can’t get enough of this cover!     ‘Caroline’ is told in third person. The entire novel is pretty much Caroline’s thoughts. This gives the story a very different feel then the ‘Little House’ books. Since it is told from an adult’s perspective it has a much grittier and darker tone. Children are able to see everything as an adventure where adults have to sweat the details and shoulder the worry. This is true when comparing ‘The […]

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We Are All That’s Left…by Carrie Arcos #Blogtour

We Are All That’s Left…by Carrie Arcos #Blogtour

Zara feels shut off from her Bosnian born mother. She knows that her mother survived some horrible things in the Bosnian war but Zara wants desperately to understand who her mother is. So when Zara, her mother, and her little brother are victims of a tourist attack, Zara begins to understand what emotional and physical trauma can do to a person and a family.   I really love a good historical fiction. Good historical fiction is entertaining while at the same time teaches us about significant events. I have noticed that much of the historical fiction out there covers the really well-known periods of history. For example: the Tutor period, the American Civil War, WWI, and especially WWII. I really love it when I find a  novel that explores world events that are lesser known . When I read the […]

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The Bone Sparrow…Zana Fraillon

The Bone Sparrow…Zana Fraillon

Subhi is born in a refugee in an internment camp. He has never seen the outside world. He has no books, no school, and not enough food, water, or clothes.   Every once in a while I stumble on a book that totally takes me by surprise. One that I haven’t heard anything about. A book that you had no idea would be so meaningful, impactful, wonderful, and life changing. One that rips out your heart, and in the process makes you a totally different person. ‘The Bone Sparrow’ is definitely one of those books. I had absolutely no idea what ‘The Bone Sparrow’ was about going in to it. Right before I started reading it, I read over the synopsis, so I had a vague idea that it was about a refuge.  I was not at all  prepared for the punch […]

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Glow…by Megan E. Bryant

Glow…by Megan E. Bryant

‘There’s a certain kind of light that I should have been afraid of all along.’   Radium was discovered by Marie Sklodowska-Curie and her husband Pierre Curie on December 21, 1898. When radium decays it causes luminescence.  With America’s entry into WWI came a need for self-luminous aircraft switches and instrument dials. Marie and Pierre Curie by André Castaigne  Soldiers involved in trench warfare were especially in need of watches that could be seen in complete darkness. The harmful effects of radium were not yet known.    Factories that produced the luminescent dials were set up Orange, New Jersey, Ottawa, Illinois, and Waterbury, Connecticut. These factories employed young girls and women to paint the numbers and hands with radium. Enter the radium girls. Watch hands painted with radium  The painters were instructed to point their paintbrushes between their lips to create finer details on the numbers […]

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